society, UK Politics, World Politics

A disastrous racial divide is splitting our society

Racial_Divulgacao

Sometimes I find myself creating an image of what I believe might be the most ideal society. I’m certainly not an expert in the field of ethics, but it would definitely enshrine some long-awaited bottom lines. My mind’s utopia would encompass deeply engrained values of equality and tolerance, have its gates open widely to all, and strive to take the issues of all into account when decision making. But I’d better not immerse myself too heavily into this fantasy. The concept of the perfect society won’t truly exist, ever. But it seems worth aiming for in an attempt to quash the most profound of social barriers.

It would simply be inaccurate to suggest that our global community is accepting of all values currently. Don’t get me wrong – many of the reasons for hostility to any perceived outsiders are sometimes with the best of intent and for security, not for exclusion. With an advent of new technology, values, immigration, and – in the most extreme of cases – deeply rooted factional conflict, it can seem only natural that citizens are consistently wary and vigilant.

Deeply worrying news has come this week of some of the most opportunity-bashing and equality-defying divides. The presence of new communities seems to be provoking new and controversial thinking. Brand new studies and news stories have shown that the ideas of inclusion and openness promoted by our politicians, NGOs and schools just do not prevail in ways previously thought .

Over previous days, the existence of distinct barriers to numerous sections of our society has been widely reported. The TUC reported today that at all levels of education and employment in Britain, those of minority ethnic descent are significantly disadvantaged in terms of opportunities, livelihoods and job security. A modern society like Britain can only achieve prosperity and success if it wholeheartedly welcomes people of all mindsets and experiences. Immigration cannot take place begrudgingly, a state of affairs which unfortunately seems existent, ever punctuated by the emergence of movements such as UKIP. Such striking deprivation and unemployment amongst those of minority ethnic backgrounds does not and will not make for a thriving society.

A culture of divides is further endorsed by such unnecessary prejudice. It is evident that racial profiling is creating exclusive communities, creating a feeling of ‘them and us.’ Only last month, one passenger on an easyJet flight was escorted from the plane after a fellow traveller spotted prayers on their neighbour’s phone. The overly accentuated cons of immigration, and relatively sporadic – but undeniably atrocious – national terrorism incidents have led to scaremongering at all levels. It seems that Britain is not a wholly welcoming community. Solidarity and the nurturing of new, vibrant values must be backed.

Possibly one of the gravest problems in relation to our split societies is to do with those who bear power. Even at the top, our law enforcers fail to uphold the values that could rejuvenate our national ethos. It is shameful that a large number of those who are wrongly stopped and searched by our local authorities are so harshly racially profiled. Figures released last year showed that those of black race were over 17 times more likely to be stopped. More scandalously, the rate of further police action which was actually followed through after a search was markedly less.

What about the upcoming local elections, which seem to be exposing the opinions of our politicians to a further extent than previously thought? Those who are battling to become the next London mayor, Sadiq Khan and Zac Goldsmith, have become embroiled in a huge race debate. The past few weeks have allowed the public to closely watch the scaremongering of the Tory candidate Goldsmith, who has horridly accused Labour candidate Khan of protecting minorities, fuelling the rise of extremism. The Labour candidate is not the only one of his party to be in such a quandary. Corbyn has faced calls from both inside and out for a stronger clamping down on the disgusting anti-Semitic views which circulate in many of the party’s branches.

So, what next? Britain must transform its social attitudes, adopting values of inclusivity, openness and warmth. This transformation can only take place, however, with a driving force from the top. Our elected officials and law enforcers must work on creating Britain the open nation it has the potential to be. The most important fix is a surprisingly easy one. It is time that we saw each equally. Instead of labelling and classifying citizens into one category or another, we must become a truly solid community. If it is anything to go by, today marks a real possibility for change. I hugely welcome the remarks of Maria Miller, chair of the Women and Equality Select Committee in the UK Parliament, today calling for increased legislation aimed at weakening such abhorrent abuse and needless divides. Perhaps the utopia which I blueprinted at the start will inevitably never exist. There is no such thing as the perfect society, but isn’t it a concept worth working to? Simply, our governments and leaders must now outline common goals, properly enshrine our all important rights and adopt a nature of true realpolitik.

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